Top 7 Introverted Teen Problems (The Struggle is Real!)

Top 7 Introverted Teen Problems (The Struggle is Real!)

The teens are tough for anyone. But being an introverted teen comes with its own specific set of painful problems. There is the pain of wanting to belong, but instead, always feeling out of place . There is the absolute agony of always understanding, and never being understood. Then, of course, there is the confusion of having a personality that turns inward when everyone is pushing you to be more outgoing. As an introverted teen, you also struggle with the pain of constantly being forced into places (i.e. school) that highlight just how different you are. Isn’t it ironic that being quiet and observant is something that makes you stand out nowadays? You are the black crow in a crowded jungle of parakeets. You are simultaneously ignored and singled out for your quiet nature. So, yeah, being an introverted teen isn’t easy. Hopefully, today’s article will help you see that you’re not alone, even if you desperately want to be. Here are 7 introverted teen problems that show that the struggle is real for young introverts: 1. Pretending to be immature to fit in. As an introverted teen, you tend to be more introspective and reflective than many of your friends. While others focus on the superficial, you think and feel deeply. Basically, you are an old soul in a teen body. This isn’t exactly the norm in your high school, so you force yourself to be more superficial and fun. You act immature so that you don’t get called out for that weird inner Yoda thing you’ve got going on. Here’s my simple advice for you: A wise one...
An Introvert’s Strange Sleeping Disorder

An Introvert’s Strange Sleeping Disorder

  2 am knows all my secrets. I think this has a lot to do with the fact that I’m an introvert. We introverts crave the absolute solitude that only the cloak of night can offer. While others are snoozing soundly, dreaming of showing up to school naked, we are wide awake. And enjoying every minute. I used to think that my strange sleeping patterns were just a glitch in my internal clock, something I could fix with practice and determination. But now I know that there are just too many factors that keep an introvert like me awake at night. Quiet house, loud thoughts Since nighttime is usually the quietest time of day in any home, it is also when we introverts hear our own thoughts most clearly. When the lights go out, our brain turns on. We think about our problems, our projects, our passions, and our people. While others stay up to canoodle with their partners, we whisper sweet nothings in our own ear. We must copulate with every idea, dream, and worry until our brain puts on its flannel pyjamas and says it has a headache. Secret conversations Late at night is also when we have the best and most honest conversations with ourselves. Some might call this weird, or even crazy. In truth, our inner conversations are what keep an introvert sane. Unfortunately, they also keep us sleep deprived much of the time. On top of our own thoughts, we have another more sneaky adversary on our quest for eight hours of good night’s sleep. The sneakiest sleep thief This particular obstacle has gotten...
An Open Letter to Introverts Who Feel Broken

An Open Letter to Introverts Who Feel Broken

Dear introvert, I see that you’re hurting. And I think I know why. Like so many of us quiet, sensitive souls, you feel broken. You see yourself as that beat-up old stuffed teddy bear with a missing eye, and limp limbs. You aren’t puffed up and outgoing like the other bears. Your personality seems dull in comparison to theirs. Somewhere along the line, someone told you that they had the magical cure for your brokenness. They told you that the antidote to your pain was to put on a new personality – one that was shinier, more talkative, and more enthusiastic than your true self. They told you to do more and feel less. While you’re at it, stop thinking so much for goodness sake! You took their medicine, and I guess you know what happened next. It seemed to work at first, but it had strange side-effects. The harder you tried to be up and on all the time, the more exhausted and empty you felt. When overwhelm set in, you began shutting down, and pushing people away. This made you feel even worse. “Why can’t I just relax and have fun like everyone else?” you asked yourself, as you checked your watch for the tenth time. What you were really wondering was … “Why can’t I just be an extrovert? Life would be better – I would be better – if I could just fix my personality.” Needless to say, the extrovert’s quick-fix for introversion never works. And it’s not because it makes you exhausted and irritable. Or because it eats away at your soul. Or because it...
Introvert – How to NOT feel guilty for staying home

Introvert – How to NOT feel guilty for staying home

Staying home is meant to be bliss for an introvert. But this isn’t always the case. Often, our sweet solitude turns sour. And here’s the most annoying part: Our staycations and hibernations are foiled by something we feel like we have no control over. Something that is both our greatest ally and our most feared opponent. Have you guessed what I’m talking about yet? It’s our own mind, of course. The minute we take some precious introvert “me time”, our brain starts making us feel guilty about it. Introverts don’t trust ourselves The problem is, we don’t trust ourselves. We think that one night in will multiply to six, then ten, then before we know it we are Forever Alone and surrounded by cats. There’s another, more painful reason for our guilt. We think that alone means selfish. And selfish means bad. And bad means unloveable. We really can’t help thinking this way. This simple train of logic was branded on our innocent introvert brain before we could even speak. It’s all so sad because being alone is a necessary perk of being an introvert. We can plug ourselves into solitude and magically emerge recharged and ready to take on the world again. So, how can an introvert shed the guilt, and actually enjoy staying home? 3 Steps to get rid of introvert guilt: Find the source of your introvert guilt. Do you feel guilty because you believe that liking your alone time is selfish? Do you fear that you’ll love hibernating so much that you’ll never want to emerge from your cave? Do you believe that others will judge you for...
Introvert – I thoroughly enjoy minding my own business

Introvert – I thoroughly enjoy minding my own business

I’m an introvert. I won’t necessarily initiate conversation with you if I don’t know you. It’s not because I’m aloof, or cold, or shy. It’s just that I really enjoy minding my own business. Another way to put it is that I love attending to the business of my mind: the steady stream of thoughts and ideas, the expansive landscapes of imagination, even the familiar channels of worry. Sometimes I feel guilty about minding my own business. I don’t want people to think I dislike them, or that I am rude, or uncaring. I hope they don’t assume that my mind and heart are closed when I keep to myself. The infinite introvert You might have seen a picture somewhere depicting introverts with a small personal space bubble. When I am exploring my imagination, my world has no borders. I can dive deep into an ocean of memories. I can sail freely through a current of dreams. There is a famous quote from the book The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky. The main character Charlie and his two best friends Patrick and Sam are driving through a tunnel at night, the song “Landslide” blasting from the stereo. They exit the tunnel and see downtown lights and “everything that makes you wonder”. Then comes the famous line: “And in that moment, I swear we were infinite.” Charlie is a teen introvert who mostly minds his own business. Yet, through his writing we see that his inner world is infinite. It is only through his ability to “see things … keep quiet about them, and … understand” that he...
Why Lunchtime Sucks For Introverts

Why Lunchtime Sucks For Introverts

Lunch hour is often the most dreaded time of day for introverts. Contrary to what you might think, our secret lunchtime anxieties have nothing to do with food. See if this scenario sounds familiar: It’s break time at the office, which means you have one hour to chow down, and relax. If you work in a job that requires a lot of talking and dealing with people, you desperately need this time to recharge and fortify yourself against the day ahead. But there’s one problem. For other people, lunch hour is all about catching up with coworkers. Your extroverted colleagues congregate together, and engage in one of the most offensive pastimes to an introvert. Small talk. For extroverts, chatting with others is replenishing. For introverts, not so much. Over the years, we’ve come up with all sorts of sneaky ways to avoid small talk. When it comes to lunchtime at work, you’ll likely see us doing one of the following: Hiding behind a book, and doing everything in our power to avoid eye contact with other humans. Sneaking off to a secluded area of the office where we munch away in sweet solitude. Escaping the office all together and wandering the nearby streets or stores in the hopes that we won’t see anyone we know. Don’t get me wrong, introverts are not necessarily anti-social. And we might really like our coworkers. But small talk is NOT how we want to spend our precious one-hour lunch break. Instead of replenishing us, as it does extroverts, lunchtime chit chat drains us. How to make lunchtime less sucky First of all, let go...

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