Why INFJs Attract Narcissist Personalities

narcissist personalities INFJ

Dear INFJ friend,

You’ll probably relate to this. As an INFJ, you most likely already know that we are magnets for narcissist personalities. What troubles us the most is the feeling of guilt INFJs feel when we start thinking it’s our fault.

We are our own worst critics, especially when we face external pressure. I had my share of relationships with narcissists and I always felt like it was all my fault. I felt worthless and lonely. So I had to ask myself…

Why narcissist personalities prey on INFJs

INFJs are called protectors. However, that protection can go against our own better judgement. Because we want to indulge and “fix” our partner or friend who is a narcissist, we unconsciously sabotage our own feelings. Desperately wanting to give love, INFJs start losing the one thing we need the most — self-love.

According to Deborah Ward, the author of “Overcoming Low Self-Esteem with Mindfulness”, it’s important to remember that it’s not your love narcissist personalities need. It’s their own. Ward adds:

“You will never be able to ‘fix’ anyone. Everyone has their own path to follow and to become a whole and healthy person, everyone needs to walk that path on their own, making their own mistakes, learning to pick themselves up, and discovering how to love themselves.”

narcissist personalities

Narcissists will only see their own image reflected when they look at you. They will never see who you really are. It’s pointless to try to give love to a narcissist. They will never be satisfied, or grateful.

What you need to do is give that love to yourself, because you deserve it. Your road is not bound to someone who will stop you from fulfilling your full INFJ potential. I should know…

It’s not your fault

There was a time when I was in a toxic relationship with a hardcore narcissist. There was no us in that relationship, only her. I was at a point where I nearly repeated a year in college because I could not concentrate due to the feeling of guilt. I couldn’t convince myself that I hadn’t done anything wrong.

If you’re in a similar situation, try to convince yourself that there was nothing you did or said that brought you into a relationship with a narcissist, it just happened. The main goal of  narcissist personalities is to make you feel guilty and less worthy.

Concentrate on what you can do to safely get out of this relationship and to recognize your true, wonderful value. Luckily, there are several effective ways to do this.

5 safe ways to leave a relationship with a narcissist

1. Accept where you are.

This doesn’t mean that you have to make peace with the current situation. You are only accepting it so that you can find a solution faster and more efficiently. When you accept where you are, you are ready to act and allow yourself to focus on what you can do to change it.

2. Acknowledge your worth.

Remember, the primary goal of  narcissist personalities is to make you feel less worthy than you actually are. Don’t allow this. You know in your heart who you are, you know the strength of your kindness, understanding, and empathy. Never allow anyone to convince you that your amazing INFJ traits are weird or not normal.

3. Decide you deserve much more.

Your gentle INFJ personality is not meant to be with someone who will not give you the feedback you deserve. Your heart needs the same love and care that you so selflessly give. In order to flourish, INFJs need to be encouraged, not humiliated. Decide to leave anything and anyone that makes you feel bad and as if you don’t deserve more.

4. End the guilt cycle.

You are not responsible for everyone, my fellow INFJ. Narcissists will use your caring nature against you. They know that you will almost always blame yourself. Don’t be hard on yourself in moments like this, especially when guilt tries to grab a hold over you. It’s then when you must shake off the bond and say no.

5. Remember your accomplishments.

Your greatest INFJ gift of self-preservation comes from reminding yourself what you accomplished. When a narcissist tries to humiliate and discourage you, remind yourself what you’ve been through. Let your hardship give you the strength to change where you are and direct you to where you want to be.

It’s your birthright to be loved and appreciated by someone who will fully cherish and accept you, just the way you are.

You deserve to be loved

As INFJs, we always thought there was something wrong with us. We believed that we don’t deserve to be loved. We secretly sabotaged our chances of having a loving partner or friend, because we were convinced that we are not good enough. Please don’t blame yourself.

This self-shame comes as a result of external pressure. The truth is, you are so much more than meets the eye. Don’t allow anyone to turn off your internal spark. Your worth is not determined by someone’s inability to see it. It comes deep from within. Even if someone else doesn’t see it, that’s okay. You must see it for yourself and that’s all that matters.

INFJs attract narcissist personalities because of that pure goodness, kindness, love, understanding, and appreciation that shines from us. It reminds them of what they simply don’t have. That’s why they are drawn to us.

Your INFJ light leads the way, but it’s you who decides with whom you will share that spark. Choose to share it to someone who will embrace you completely, just as you are. You deserve to be loved.

What about you?

Have you ever been in a relationship or a friendship with a narcissist? How did you got out of it? Feel free to share your thoughts and experiences, I would love to know how you handled this highly unpleasant situation.

The topic of INFJs attracting narcissist personalities comes up a lot on our free private INFJ Forum. Want to join the discussion?

Join our community, and feel connected to other INFJs who get you. With 10,000+ members, we are truly a buzzing community! Join today, and you’ll receive our 20-page INFJ Relationship guide as a gift. You’ll also gain access to unique INFJ blog posts, infographics, and webinars.

Much love,

Marko

Hi, I’m Marko, the Introvert Spring INFJ forum coordinator. I’m a writer and certified professional coach, with a rich background in leadership and communications. Right now, my biggest passion is helping to grow the Introvert Spring INFJ forum, so INFJs have a place to feel seen, understood, and inspired.

35 Comments

  1. The problem with narcissistic relationships is that you can’t see them until you’re in one, and even then, you doubt your judgement, it becomes an endless cycle of ‘maybe if I did this, he’d be happy,’ But what I learned from my narcissist is that you will both spend inordinate amounts of time trying to make them happy, and no one cares how you feel at the time, not even you. And especially not them. It takes a great emotional toll, and you have to work very hard to build yourself up again from what feels like nothing. It’s painful, it takes a long time, but it’s possible. And maybe the hardest part is watching them move on to new victims, not because you wish you had them back, but because they’re now destroying yet another life.

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    • These are good points, Leah, thank you for sharing them. I have to agree with you, it’s not easy, and when we do get out of the narcissistic relationship, due to our INFJ empathy, it’s not easy to see a narcissist are moving onto the next one.

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  2. I was married to a narcissist for 15 years. I did not realize or are this side of him until after, shortly after, we were married and I asked him to participate in the day-to-day activities that make a house a home and a bunch of people a family.

    By the time I got out I was nothing to him or myself. My morivation for getting out was my girls and knowing if I stayed, I was basically saying it’s ok to be treated like crap; and in 25 years when I saw them in the same situation I was in it would be my fault for not standing up for myself or them.

    He actually told me, “when I leave you’ll never have it as good as you have it now.”

    Financially I have struggled, but my girls and I are better off not having to live the lie.

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    • I’m really sorry you had to go through this Jill, and that you had to hear these words. But you made the right decision, you stood up for yourself and made the right call. You got this, and you and your girls will make it, I have no doubt about that. You have my full support. And one more thing, you are enough, you matter, and you are important!

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  3. My husband of 20+ years (still married) is a narcissist. I could write a book. It’s a very complicated and hard life to live. We have children and even though I have a job I am not financially independant. If I knew a safe way out I’d leave, but the other side of the medal would be fighting over lots of issues (childrens, house, etc.). Problem is to the outside world I am the ‘depressed’ one because of my introverted personality (talking misjudgment big time). Outsiders don’t recognize the narcissist; they see the outgoing husband with his pitiful quiet wife. Therapy together? now way, even therapists don’t easily recognize it. He’s jovial, flamboyant, extroverted, outgoing while I like to stay indoors, avoid parties and like reading books, playing music and spending quality time with few friends or my children. I am sort of invisible while he is very visible. I have found out how to live in a survival mode, I have a very rich inner life that is fullfilling, a very good relationship with my children. I saw a psychologist alone for over a year. It helped a great deal. I know who I am, I have not lost myself and I do love myself. I have also learned to harden myself not to get hurt when he often shouts at me “what’s wrong with you??!!” when I don’t like to do the same things he likes to do. I play music and create art. It makes me happy….. in the midst of this missery of living with an unloving spouse. I am working out a plan to make a change for the better. I will eventually choose for myself and my children.

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    • I’m really sorry you find yourself in this situation, Elisa. I believe that it’s not easy, and I can only imagine what you are going through daily. Narcissist only see themselves in a relationship, there is no plural. But I am glad that you know who you are, that you are aware of what’s happening and that you love yourself, this is the key. There is nothing wrong with you, there never was. You have an amazing personality!

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  4. As an INFP, I have found myself over my lifetime in narcissistic relationships with a partner, friends or family members. Whether it is the “idealistic dreamer” of the INFP, seeing the goodness we hope people can be? Or, wanting to believe in the “authenticity” of people and celebrate “who they are” that causes us to become involved. But, there is a similarity of the INFJ & INFP to get caught up and deeply involved and many times lost within these relationships with narcissistic people. Over time though it does become apparent that these narcissists are only in it for themselves.
    As I have gotten older, it has become more apparent and easier for me to just quietly walk away from such relationships. Generally, they are far too involved with their own reflection, that they aren’t even aware when you have moved on from the relationship.

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    • You are absolutely right, Deborah. Narcissist are just too much involved in their own image that they are not simply interested in anyone else, only to “feed” that image they have created for themselves. I can understand you when it comes to being in a narcissistic relationship all to well. And yes, there is a huge similarity between the INFJs & INFPs in this, because we share a deep level of emotions, devotion, and dedication.

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  5. This was so very helpful to remember since I enjoy by default looking for the highlights in others and this default generalization of looking at life through these filters; I fell and fall prey to narcs. I don’t enjoy looking through a suspicious lens or overly adoring one. I have learned to observe myself and analyze patterns of behavior. I caught myself this morning feeling down about not being liked by a narc co-worker and manager; only to coach myself through these feelings and declare to myself, I’ve been through this before, I won then and I will win now; no more handing myself over! I deserve inner harmony and I’m kicking them out of my headspace, over and over again.

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    • Hi Liza! I’m glad to hear you found the article helpful. I’m glad you made this decision, you will win again, and you do deserve inner harmony. 🙂

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  6. Thanks for the great article. The comments have been insightful, too! I almost cried while reading this, it hit so close to home. I have more narcissists than I care to admit in my life right now, and am just at the point of seeing them after dealing with the self blame for a few years now.

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    • You are most welcome, Brittany! I’m glad you liked the article, and the comments too. 🙂 I understand you. Just remember, it’s not your fault, and be more gentle to yourself.

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  7. Ps: I’d like to add this goes for non-romantic relationships, too! This article is the perfect “pep talk” for when we start to lose ourselves and forget we matter, too.

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    • Great observation Brittany! Yes, this is also for friendships and other non-romantic relationships as well. And thank you so much once more. 🙂

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  8. I was raised by a narcissistic mother. I still have difficulty with my self esteem and I’must middle aged!

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    • I’m sorry Sally you still feel what happened in the past and that it affects your self-esteem, but I hope the article helped you a little and gave you some insight. It’s never easy for INFJs to handle when the people who should be closest to us turn out to be narcissists.

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    • I was raised by a narc mother. It was only after she passed away did I realize what the harmful dynamic was. Thank goodness for my wonderful, gentle father who loved me in a healthy fashion. Poor guy had to be in a married relationship all his life. I know now why I attract narcs, am doing a lot of research via you-tube videos on the subject.

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  9. I belong to a Facebook group for the victims of narcs. A while back we did an experiment on personality types using Briggs Myers. I’d long suspected a link between narcs selected victims and personality. Sure enough over 90% of us came out as INFJ’s will all others combining out as INTJ’s or INFS.

    I’ve been no contact with my narc adopted mother for 18 months. Best decision I ever made!!

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    • I’m glad you are in this FB group, Eowyn, and that you feel good about the decision you made. Sometimes, this is the safest course of actions for us INFJs when it comes to narcissists, despite how hard it may be.

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  10. I am emerging from a 34 year relationship with a man with whom I had 3 children. Even though I thought I chose someone who was nothing like my narcissistic father, in the end he was. He left me for a younger woman and is busy re-charming my daughters. I have been to the bottom of a black pit of self blame and back, lost my sense of self and what makes me happy, waded through the trauma that triggered old traumas and I’m still here- not addicted to anything too terrible except the need for love. Someone to know my virtues. Someone who knows who I am and appreciates that. I know that someone is me but she is still in pain.

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  11. I’m so sorry Coralie that you had to go through this… You’ve been through so much, but be proud of yourself. The strength you showed is amazing! Do not stop, you will find that love and that person who will accept you fully, as wonderful as you are, I am sure of it!

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  12. I referenced this article twice today when speaking with people about the scars I have as a result of these relationships. I grew up in an abusive home, I married an abusive man, I made abusive friends, almost all of whom were severe narcissists. They also had the same control over me, in that I wanted to help them, or they convinced me they could nurture me. Each time when I confronted them I got the same reaction – that I was a bad person, selfish, ungrateful, sinful, emotionally dangerous, etc. My father still has no idea, no matter how many times I tried to confront him, and I have now cut my relationship with him off for my own safety. My ex-husband would get on his knees and beg me to save him, almost with the same breath he used to abuse me, and always convince me that it was my fault and I was a bad woman. The people who tried to help me sort of did so, in getting me out and providing for me for a time, but it always came with a catch. Some right to my body, my life, or my heart. Right after my divorce, I was taken in by a well-respected professor and his family. I quickly began to learn that their home was little else than a cult, built around his every whim, fully believing him practically a prophet of God and with that much authority. The wife told me she was also an INFJ, and I really am not sure that is true based on what I saw, but she believed what the Professor told her, in that the way for her to be free of her own trauma was to bully herself into spiritual submission, and do everything he said. After several months of watching her destroy herself, neglect her child, push their family further into financial ruin and decay, and berate me if I ever even questioned the Professor, not to mention late night yelling where he would tell her God is coming for her because she is such a bad woman, I left. On my way out I was cursed by her so hard that I was truly afraid the earth was going to swallow me up. I was ungrateful, evil, sinful, cruel. I didn’t even understand what was happening, and looking back, I realize that not only was he a horrible narcissist, but that she was his prisoner. The worst part is that these people were not vagabonds on the street, but well-known, respected, published, wealthy, etc. In all cases except for those concerning my ex-husband, no one who knows those people really believes me. Or if they do, they seem to be under a spell of control where they just accept it. Today, as I thought about this article, I was told by another survivor that she had to ask herself if she believed she was worthy to be on this planet, and I realized I still can’t answer that question myself. I am safe, I am cared for, my career is back on track, I have a home, and while I do have constant medical care and the scars of my trauma have taken so much from me, its over now. I feel locked now in a frightening spiral of wanting so much to take care of others, needing so much care myself, and having almost no idea how to communicate these things. I keep being told, by good people, that I have such an open heart, and open mind, and am so kind, funny, smart, visionary, etc…but I can’t see these things in myself. Learning about about my personality type has helped me feel a little more understood, like I am not just crazy for being myself, and figuring out what is me, and what isn’t. I wondered recently why I keep finding myself in the same type of situation with the same type of person, and every single time my deep desire for connection and commitment lands me in trouble, with someone who seemed to be my friend, even my lover (or the maid-of-honor at my second wedding), and who suddenly takes off a mask and becomes verbally abusive, threatening, dishonest, and…just blind. I realize I don’t know how to form healthy relationships with healthy people. I am now always confused. I am not sure I can trust my intuition, or even how to really listen to it. Its like a car with a bad engine that keeps turning on and off. My natural observance is coupled with a learned suspicion and paranoia – sometimes it feels like who I am has been hijacked and re-wired for a darker purpose, or more accurately, to protect me from one. My heart feels almost like its own being, but I am not sure how to listen to it or if I can trust it. So I suppose my question is, once out, how do we heal? How do we learn to sooth the cuts and burns, replenish the skin, reinvigorate the roots, and clarify the vision again? Help of course, and I am in therapy and I do so much, but none of them can speak to my core the way I hope other INFJs can.

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    • I am so sorry you went through all of this Shelly, I really am… I deeply thank you for sharing your story here. We heal gradually, one step at a time. There is no magical formula, but there is hope that someone, somewhere will come and help us heal all those wounds and make our scars the thing of the past. You are still here and that is proof that you are meant for something great. After going through what you gone through I cannot escape the feeling that you will find that person who will make all your memories of the past, into a happiness of the present. I am no professional therapist,, but I admire your strength and courage. One step at a time. Don’t lose hope, no matter what. Some scars never heal, but they are there to tell us one thing: You can do this, even if no one else sees it, you must see it for yourself. Keep moving,m don’t stop, and whatever you do, listen to your heart. You don’t have to learn to listen, just listen. Thank you again for sharing this story.

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  13. Thank you so much!!! I really needed this article now. I was actually almost going to write in the forum the other day for help with a narcissist. I’m not completely sure but I think I have someone in my life who’s a narcissist and I’m obviously an empath/INFJ. The ramifications from this relationship, which at its onset seemed so benign and innocent, have caused a lot of emotional torture and trauma for me. I almost feel as though these thoughts sometimes consume me and I literally cannot focus on anything else or do anything well when I try. When the relationship is good, it puts me in a good mood and if it’s bad, I’m virtually paralyzed. The poles and extremes are really scary to me and I wouldn’t ever willingly let myself get like this, but yet here I am. And I feel so weak and foolish for letting this happen. I would just leave if I can…any person would who’s clearly being mistreated beyond measure and hurt and disposed and exposed and used. So why can’t I??? I usually pride myself with independence and not caring about what people think of me, but in this relationship I feel like my identity is out the window. Around this person, I get nervous, I feel myself being awkward but I can’t help it, I barely smile (which I do at most people), I apologize too much for literally nothing, and it’s just bizarre. Despite all of these evidently horrible effects, something about he relationship is addictive or keeps me coming back. We started as friends then he suggested we take it farther, meaning we kiss but stay friends and no one knows. It’s been over a year since we had romantic relations (we only kissed) and then afterwards, he was so cruel to me so I had a break and wanted to cut him off and then he gave me a really convincing apology and then we were just friends again. I gave myself excuses for why the friendship was one-sided (after the apology)–I would do so much for him and tell myself that he really appreciated he just couldn’t express because he’s still immature/he can’t tell his feelings but deep down he cares, etc. We weren’t having romantic relations since the first time and hadn’t discussed it, till recently he brought it up and I realized the person he is–I don’t know what he wants for me or why he enjoys watching me squirm so much. He can get a lot of girls, and I don’t put out (definitely not without strings attached…I’m a relationship/commitment kind of girl and he knows it). Why is he seeking me out for this then? Is it a power thing? Does he want to corrupt the “innocent virgin”? I know I need to get out of it and so I said no to romantic relations, let’s just be friends, and then I said I didn’t like our friendship dynamic so maybe we shouldn’t be friends but he said it’ll change so we’re friends again. And if anything has changed since his saying that, I feel it’s worse. I know OBVIOUSLY any logical person would cut the cord…but why can’t I? Am I addicted to even the slightest bit of attention form him? I’m not one to crave/seek attention but is that the case in this relationship? I know these are questions I should be asking myself but I need the help of you guys and professionals and fellow INFJs. One of the hardest things about being INFJ for me (especially with this unique narcissist-INFJ relationship/caveat) is that others can’t really understand. The bottom line is I need to leave him but there is an emotional connection/component and fear of loss here…loss of what? A “special relationship”? Hardly…if anything ,it ‘s abusive…so why can’t i leave? If I told a close friend it’d be black and white–he sucks, leave him, he doesn’t deserve you, etc…which is all true. I feel like the esoteric/INFJ-only part comes in the why-did-I-like-him-in-the-first-place / why-did-I-let-this-happen question. Because that question is very real and as caring as we are, we’re selective with the people we love. We want to help everyone but we usually spend time on the people we think are worth it /have potential. Marko you are amazing so you might answer this and I really hope someone cares enough to read/see this. I am so grateful for you all! I’m grateful for the people in my life whom I love but I need you guys to help me because I’m always there for others (classic INFJ) and as much as they say they’re there for me (which some mean it), they sometimes can’t help me because I know my mind is too complex and I protect them because I don’t want them in my mind…it can be a scary place. I’m sorry to expose you all to this and this darkness but I need the help I can get. Being and INFJ is amazing but it’s so exhausting and as you can see my emotions are thoroughly wring out from it. Thank you and i wish all of you all the happiness and love the world can offer!

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    • Hi, namasteinfj! You are most welcome, and I am glad you found this article at the right time. Put your feelings into a different perspective. One option is that you stay in this enchanted circle of having that person in your life but at the cost of your own happiness and well being (which is something I also did , and it brought me much inner pain), or that you safely change something and face that period of adaptation, but that you restore yourself and who you are through time. I will not directly tell you what to do, because this is a decision you must make for yourself. Just put everything into a perspective of what would make you feel your own true self, your own amazing value, and what would make you feel not just happy, but also fulfilled as an INFJ.

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  14. Great article Marko. I am INFJ, felt like I was drowning, wanted to drown myself for “allowing” this to happen; today, I am floating on lifesaver. There are good days, bad days and sometimes moments in between that shift from weak to strong. An ocean of emotions that’s for sure. Keeping informed about the subject of narcs has been the strongest tool for me. Implementing no-contact is the most important, but not easy and can take a few tries. To other INFJ’s: Don’t give up on yourselves INFJ. Don’t look in the mirror and think you have turned dark or ugly. Forget the self guilt for things you were made to do or accept that were out of character for you. None of that is true, your mind was tricked, it may have happened, but you never bought in, you were a robot, programmed by the narc. We INFJ’s are special and have the power within us to do this, to get away from those who sought us specifically for our empathetic nature. They do not deserve us, and we do not deserve them. Sometimes, I wonder why we can’t use the “door slam” method on these narcs but we can on others so easily. The answer is simple. Others do not “work on us” they haven’t spent the time figuring out how to manipulate us, program us so deeply, while with a narc, this is the narcs job, to figure out, watch, observe, even research us in some cases, then they make their move by falsely connecting. Others get door slammed easily because they haven’t gotten in to our mind so deeply in a way that they can navigate and even stage an anticipated reaction like a narc does. I wish it was easier to door slam a narc but they will battle a door slam, smearing your name until you respond. Today is a good day (thankfully) so I am encouraging anyone who is new to learning about this narc thing to continue. Learn how they use music to seduce you, learn why they build you up, promising the world and just give you opposite, learn how they use the “soul mate” approach to capture your heart, learn how they dump you in the dirt when you need them most, learn how they will kill a favorite pet just because you love the pet a lot, learn how they can mock your emotions to make you feel there is a connection like a god sent soul mate, and learn why INJF’s are easy targets, like the fact that we spend many years feeling misunderstood and not very connected….a narc will fill that every feeling, from pretending they had similar experiences in life, to pretending to love animals, and sharing same spiritual beliefs but it is only because they have studied their prey, and INFJ’s feel like they have found the ONE person they’ve been hoping for. Learn about it, and take action to save yourself before the narc murders your spirit. We got this INFJ’s, we have the strengths and the smarts to, BUT you have to educate yourself on this topic. Narcs are crazy and some are dangerous, so learn how to leave in a safe manner….learn about confronting a narc, just go learn it all. Again, thank you Marko for this article, it is written in a way that makes a lot of sense. Hugs to everyone who is battling a narc.

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    • Thank you so much Meli for sharing your incredible insight and story on this, and for your kind words. 🙂 You are most welcome!

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  15. This was very helpful, thank you. I’ve been out of my toxic relationship with a narcissist for quite some time but I still feel guilty. I still ask myself questions like “What did I do wrong to draw this person to me?” I still sometimes blame myself for not figuring out what he was sooner or getting out sooner or being too weak or too . . . something or other. It’s good to be reminded it’s not your fault.

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    • You are most welcome, Daria. I’m glad to hear you found the article helpful. 🙂 I can fully relate with how you feel and how you felt, but like you also said and I completely agree, it’s not your fault and you haven’t done anything wrong.

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  16. thank you for sharing this, how I wish I knew this earlier. I have had many narcissict (friendships) in my life, I always felt guilt that I didn’t want to be around them or cringed when they called, but would always (or still do) answer them and try so hard to be nice, when I really wanted to run and/or ignore them. One inparticular turned very ugly. when I didn’t keep an appointment once after 7 years, this person vowed to destroy me and has perceded to lie and falsely accuse me of horrible things, trying to destroy my reputation, character, and even my vocation. this person has harrassed me for 5 years even though I have completely ignored their attempts to contact me with very foul and damaging emails, texts, etc. I have blocked them from everything possible and had to delete accounts ect. to stop their harassment. it has been very stressful. I use to feel guilty thinking I did something wrong, but have done nothing to merit their behavor or accusations. I can’t understand a narcissist, but as hard as it is I can only pray that I will see the warning signs before I ever let another one into my inner circle. It’s probably needless to say it has caused me to have severe trust issues and I have become even more introverted and of course I beat myself up for that 😉 always trying to be somewhat social when I really don’t want to… but I am working on it.

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    • You are most welcome! I’m really sorry you had to go through all of this. I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been… It’s good that you are careful and cautious, and remember, be who you are and don’t force yourself to do something that will make you feel bad (when sometimes you don’t want to be social).

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  17. What if I am the narcissist in the relationship? I’m an INFJ, but I’ve had periods of my life when I was the selfish one in the relationship. How do I know if it’s my spouse who is more narcissistic or me?

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    • Hi nicholesap! You need to follow the signs, especially those early signs if you are being with an narcissists, or if you at any case show one. Lack of encouragement, support, selfishness,downgrade of ones abilities and public humiliation scenes are usually the early signs where you can notice are you in this kind of an relationship. Analyze your actions and compare them how you feel and do they positively or negatively affect your spouse. Put yourself in a different perspective. This will give you an insight of whether something has to be changed.

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  18. Hey Marko,

    Nice article here for us INFJ’s and the seemingly inevitable encounter/relationship(s) with narcissists. It’s a bit ironic to me that I think I may be the only guy here who fell in deep with a covert narcissist woman in 2013. I split the scene two years later but, the wounds and mental twists have just recently abated. I feel whole, strong, and even somehow better off for the experience, not that I recommend it or would ever go through a situation like this again.

    If there’s one thing I could say is that as INFJs, we do have the uncanny ability to get the gut instinct and see the red flags when one of these sad creatures crosses our path. I know I did and ignored the warning signs – never again – if it doesn’t feel right then it isn’t.

    In the end, all I can say is she’s a great actress that’s for sure. Where I once was so full of self-loathing, doubt, and guilt I now have relief, self-confidence, and deeper compassion for others.

    Thanks for taking the time to write this and touch those that you have.

    Reply
    • Thank you so much, Dale! I am glad to hear that after everything you’ve been through, and I believe that it wasn’t easy, you are confident and deeply compassionate towards others. 🙂 You are most welcome!

      Reply

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